Skip to main content

20 From 2020

Every year since 2003 (coincidentally, the year I started this blog), I've made a compilation of some of my favorite songs of the year. I love the act of compiling and ordering, finding songs that speak to one another lyrically and that flow together seamlessly. 

In order for the mixes to have longevity, I've typically avoided choosing too many songs that lyrically reflect the events of the year. That's gotten harder every year since 2016, and I was initially worried 2020 was going to be the tipping point. This year's mix might have looked a lot different if the presidential election had gone the other way. It would have certainly been more angry and despairing, and would have included such topical songs as Ben Folds's "2020," Ben Gibbard's "Proxima B," and Sloan's "Silence Trumps Lies." All good tunes, but I'm not sure how much I'll want to revisit them.

Thankfully, instead, we have a mix with a variety of moods and cover art with a nice blue color scheme.

Tracklist:

1.  Josh Rouse - "I Miss You"

2. Vicious Vicious - "Satellite of Love"

3. Kylie Minogue - "Say Something"

4. Old 97s' - "Diamonds on Neptune"

5. Matt Wilson and His Orchestra - "Come to Nothing"

6. Turn Turn Turn - "Delaware Water Gap"

7. Taylor Swift - "The Last Great American Dynasty"

8. Kathleen Edwards - "Glenfern"

9. Fiona Apple - "Shameika"

10. Carroll - "Nona"

11. Motion City Soundtrack - "Crooked Ways"

12. Anjimile - "Baby No More"

13. Communist Daughter - "You'll Never Break My Heart"

14. Teddy Thompson - "Heartbreaker Please"

15. Caitlyn Smith - "Damn You For Breaking My Heart"

16. Semisonic - "Lightning"

17. Carly Rae Jepsen - "Comeback"

18. The Killers - "Fire in Bone"

19. Bruce Springsteen - "Letter to You"

20. Rufus Wainwright - "Peaceful Afternoon"

Comments

Sujitha said…
Kids can feel cheerful and smart when they start to watch Nursery Rhymes. The most beautiful animated nursery rhymes for Kids. Join us to teach your children through fun and entertainment.

Let's Play in the Park Rhyme
Wheels on the Bus Rhyme
Head Shoulders Knees & Toes Rhyme
5 in One Rhymes

Popular posts from this blog

Big Bad Eddie (Is Sweet Edward Now)

I wasn't surprised this week when I heard the news that Eddie Van Halen had left our mortal realm. For one, 2020 has been such a parade of awful news that nothing terrible is shocking anymore. For another, I knew Eddie had been reckoning with cancer for a long time. And for yet another, we're all just visitors here, but Eddie was especially so. We were lucky to get him for as long as we did. * With the inordinate number of monumental musicians we've lost since David Bowie's death in January 2016, it feels like my music writing has been approximately 75% eulogies. These essays have developed a predictable formula wherein I detail my personal history with that person's music. I fear the familiarity of that risks diminishing their impact, so for Eddie I wanted to honor his sense of innovation with my own. But there's a reason that formula came about. Ever since I was a teenager, the primary goal of my writing has been discovery. In the process of writing, I learn w

REO Speedwagon: Nine Lives (1979)

Where We Left Off: With Kevin Cronin back on lead vocals and Bruce Hall replacing Gregg Philbin on bass, REO Speedwagon were finally building sales momentum with two successful albums in a row. * Nine Lives  was released in July of 1979. The title was likely a reference to the fact that it was the band's ninth album (if you include You Get What You Play For ), as well as the fact that they'd survived a level of turmoil that would have been the end of a band with less fortitude. There are also nine songs on the album. Perhaps the most interesting and puzzling thing about this record - both in sound and in presentation - is how much it represented a swerve away from You Can Tune a Piano... .  You'd think that having finally hit on a successful formula REO would want to repeat it. But on the whole the music on Nine Lives abandons the countryish pop rock of the previous record in favor of a faster, harder sound, way more "Ridin' the Storm Out" than "T

REO Speedwagon: Life As We Know It (1987)

Where We Left Off: Wheels Are Turnin' was REO Speedwagon's third consecutive multi-million selling album, producing the #1 hit "Can't Fight This Feeling." * Produced by the same team as Wheels Are Turnin' (Cronin, Richrath, Gratzer, and David DeVore), Life As We Know It was recorded while when Kevin Cronin was going through a divorce. He says making the album was a welcome distraction from his family falling apart. At the same time, his relationship with Gary Richrath was fraught with tension. That set of circumstances played a huge part in the album's lyrical content, and knowing the record was the last one for the band's classic line-up makes for an intriguing listen. For example, it's commonly held that "Too Many Girlfriends," a tune about someone running too hot for too long, is Cronin taking a shot at Richrath. This is most evident in the self-referencing line, "he better find the one / he's gonna take on the run