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2007: Top Ten

See two posts down for my thoughts on the year in music. Sad to say, there's not one homerun in the bunch, but here are a few triples:

Check out Highway 290 Revisited for Richard Nelson's picks.

Bruce Springsteen: Magic

I don't even know what to make of the Boss anymore. He goes all quiet and folky for awhile, he tours with a covers band, then he makes a record that sounds like the proper follow-up to Born In The U.S.A. All in a day's work, I suppose.






Youth Group: Casino Twilight Dogs

I saw Youth Group open for Death Cab For Cutie, and they definitely fit in that indie pop milieu. But they aren't as fussy or self-conscious. These songs stuck with me this year.







Albert Hammond, Jr.: Yours To Keep

Read the review.

Just look at that cover. Awww.







Kaiser Chiefs: Yours Truly, Angry Mob

Read the review.

Though not necessarily compelling as an entire record, this has enough amazing singles (Ruby, Heat Dies Down, I Can Do It Without You, etc) to keep it in the player.



Motion City Soundtrack: Even If It Kills Me

Read the review.

The sugar rush wears off, but it's fun while it lasts!







Sloan: Never Hear The End Of It

Read the review.

Sloan may be the most underappreciated band on the continent. Well, at least the southern two-thirds.





Jimmy Eat World: Chase This Light

If I ever go completely deaf in my old age, this band will be to thank, 'cause I always crank their records. Somehow a combination of the compelling darkness of Futures with the sunny brightness of Jimmy Eat World, this is a solid effort.






Arcade Fire: Neon Bible

There's a joy and majesty to these songs, to go along with a strong air of discomfort.








Fountains Of Wayne: Traffic & Weather

Read the review.









The Shins: Wincing The Night Away

The best kind of record, the kind that compels you to keep listening and rewards you each time, until the songs are etched on your brain.

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