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20 From 2020

Every year since 2003 (coincidentally, the year I started this blog), I've made a compilation of some of my favorite songs of the year. I love the act of compiling and ordering, finding songs that speak to one another lyrically and that flow together seamlessly. 

In order for the mixes to have longevity, I've typically avoided choosing too many songs that lyrically reflect the events of the year. That's gotten harder every year since 2016, and I was initially worried 2020 was going to be the tipping point. This year's mix might have looked a lot different if the presidential election had gone the other way. It would have certainly been more angry and despairing, and would have included such topical songs as Ben Folds's "2020," Ben Gibbard's "Proxima B," and Sloan's "Silence Trumps Lies." All good tunes, but I'm not sure how much I'll want to revisit them.

Thankfully, instead, we have a mix with a variety of moods and cover art with a nice blue color scheme.

Tracklist:

1.  Josh Rouse - "I Miss You"

2. Vicious Vicious - "Satellite of Love"

3. Kylie Minogue - "Say Something"

4. Old 97s' - "Diamonds on Neptune"

5. Matt Wilson and His Orchestra - "Come to Nothing"

6. Turn Turn Turn - "Delaware Water Gap"

7. Taylor Swift - "The Last Great American Dynasty"

8. Kathleen Edwards - "Glenfern"

9. Fiona Apple - "Shameika"

10. Carroll - "Nona"

11. Motion City Soundtrack - "Crooked Ways"

12. Anjimile - "Baby No More"

13. Communist Daughter - "You'll Never Break My Heart"

14. Teddy Thompson - "Heartbreaker Please"

15. Caitlyn Smith - "Damn You For Breaking My Heart"

16. Semisonic - "Lightning"

17. Carly Rae Jepsen - "Comeback"

18. The Killers - "Fire in Bone"

19. Bruce Springsteen - "Letter to You"

20. Rufus Wainwright - "Peaceful Afternoon"

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